Easiest Ways to Quit Smoking

Quitting smoking is never easy. It’s hard to resist the urge to smoke when you’re having a strong nicotine craving.


According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 55% of adults attempted to quit smoking in 2018, yet only 8% were actually successful in quitting in the long term. Even if you’ve attempted to detox from smoking in the past and you have failed, that doesn’t mean you should give up altogether.


You can quit smoking for good, even if it takes you several tries. Remembering the negative and harmful effects of cigarette smoking while you’re getting a strong smoking craving is one great way to keep yourself motivated when you’re on a quit smoking journey.


Every time you manage to overcome a nicotine craving, you get stronger. You take one huge step towards quitting smoking for good and it becomes easier and easier.


Here are some easy things that you can do to help you along the way and make your nicotine cravings disappear forever after you quit smoking.


Try Aromatherapy and Essential Oils

Essential oils are extracts that are obtained from the roots, flowers, leaves, and fruits of various plants. Different plants provide unique health benefits and many of them can help to reduce the intensity of a smoking craving.


Essential oils are used in aromatherapy. Although aromatherapy is not a ‘cure’ for quitting smoking, it can be great to help you slowly wean yourself off nicotine. Since many essential oils have anxiety-relieving and stress-reducing effects, they can provide the same calming feeling as a cigarette.



Some of the most effective essential oils for help you to quit smoking faster are:

  • Angelica
  • Black pepper
  • Lavender 
  • Lemon Balm
  • Peppermint
  • Rosemary
  • Sweet Orange
  • Ylang Ylang

Remember Your ‘Why’

There are many reasons why you might want to quit smoking. Maybe you’re concerned about your health, you want to reduce the staining on your teeth, or you’re fed up with being out of breath all the time.


Whatever the reason, keep it at the forefront of your mind. This will help you to stay motivated during and after you quit smoking. When you’re having a strong nicotine craving, you can remember the reason you started your journey in the first place, and this should make it easier to stay away from the cigarettes.


It’s also helpful to keep in mind the benefits of quitting smoking. When you finally ditch the cigarettes, your heart and lungs will be healthier, you’ll have more energy, you won’t be out of breath as much, and you’ll save yourself a lot of money!


Despite the fact that nicotine is highly addictive, you will be able to quit smoking once and for all if you find a strong enough reason.


Consider Nicotine Replacement Therapy

When you’re trying to detox from smoking, nicotine replacement therapy may be a great option. It involves supplying your body with nicotine to overcome smoking cravings without a cigarette in sight.


There are a few different options for nicotine replacement, including:


Nicotine replacement therapy is a great way to relieve intense cravings without exposing you to the hundreds of harmful carcinogens in tobacco smoke.


Always make sure to speak to a medical professional about trying nicotine replacement therapy. Most of the time, the nicotine replacement devices will need to be prescribed by your doctor.


Build Your Support Network

When you’re finding it difficult to quit smoking, leaning on your loved ones is a great way to get through the tough times.


Let your family members and close friends know that you’re trying to quit so they can provide words of encouragement, especially when you’ve got an intense nicotine craving.


You can also find lots of local or online support networks and groups to join. In these groups, you can join lots of other people who are on the same quit smoking journey as you are. They can offer their advice and guidance on what’s working well for them, so you can try out these strategies yourself.


Identify and Avoid Your Triggers

When you’re trying to detox from smoking, one of the hardest things is trying to avoid the things that trigger a nicotine craving.


There are lots of different things that can trigger you after you quit smoking. The first step is to identify each of these things so that you can try to avoid them in the future.


Some common triggers include drinking alcohol at a social event, stress, or even something as simple as eating breakfast. Nicotine cravings are usually the strongest when you’re in situations where you would usually smoke or even when it’s a certain time of the day.


Many people have a daily routine that involves smoking at certain times of the day, such as after meals. This can make it even harder to quit smoking but it’s still possible.


When you get a strong smoking craving, take a walk, call a friend, or chew gum to distract yourself until the craving dies down.


Keep Moving

Exercise is one of the best ways to curve a nicotine craving. When you are having withdrawal symptoms, taking a walk outside or heading to the gym can be a great distraction.


Exercise is also one of the best ways to relieve stress and anxiety, which are two of the most common causes of smoking cravings. Not only can you reduce the urge to reach for a cigarette, but you can also work to improve your health and fitness at the same time.


Your exercise routine doesn’t need to be anything too strenuous. A quick walk around the block, a short cardio routine at home, or some resistance training at the gym will suffice.


Figure out the type of exercise that you find the most enjoyable and stress-relieving, ready to do when you are struggling along your quit smoking journey.


Regular exercise can improve the health of your heart and lungs. Since your cardiovascular and respiratory systems are the most affected by smoking, working to improve your heart and lung health can reduce the after-effects of several years of smoking.


Clean Your Home

Not only does cleaning act as a great distraction when you’re having a nicotine craving but it’s also necessary to remove anything that is smoking-related. Cigarette smoke has a strong smell that tends to hang around on clothing and in the air for days and days.


As soon as you’ve smoked your last cigarette, get rid of all of your lighters and ashtrays. Throw any clothes and bedding in the wash that smells like cigarette smoke to get rid of the potentially triggering smell.


Light your favorite candle to give your home a fresh new scent. Maybe you love the fruity sense or you prefer a more floral aroma. Take this as an opportunity to treat yourself (and your home) to some new pillar candles and tea lights!


Reward Yourself

As I’ve mentioned a few times in this article, quitting smoking is one of the hardest and most challenging things that you’ll ever have to go through. As the time passes after you quit smoking, make sure to acknowledge all of the hard work that you have put in.


Reward yourself by doing the things that you love. Treat yourself to a weekend away, go to a fancy restaurant, by yourself some new clothes. It’s important that you acknowledge how far you have come and everything you have achieved as this will help you to stay motivated if your smoking urges ever return.


Be Patient and Focus On the Positives

Quitting smoking is not easy. In fact, it’s probably one of the hardest things you’ll ever do. It takes time, patience, and a lot of determination. 


It’s going to be tough, especially during the first week or two. When you’re struggling, don’t be too hard on yourself.


Try to find ways to relax and wind down. Find a new hobby. Start a new workout plan. Head out with your friends for some food and drink.


Within a few days of you having your last cigarette, positive changes will begin to occur in your body. Your heart rate decreases, your stroke volume improves, and the carbon monoxide in your blood decreases significantly.


As these changes occur, you will start to notice that you have more energy, you’re not out of breath, and you feel healthier overall. Try to focus on these positives whenever you get an intense smoking craving.